Spice and Spring

I find early spring an exciting time of transition.

crocus

crocus at the allotment

 

The clocks have gone forward so all of a sudden there’s daylight into the evening.

The muddy brown hedgerows and roadsides are transformed by daffodil or crocus yellow and snowdrop green and white.

 

 

 

The tantilising warmth of midday sun is punctuated by the final throws of late winter hail and highground snow.

peak district waterfall in March

Peak District waterfall in April

I realise my cooking starts to reflect this change. I’ve loved cooking chunky, umami winter stews and roasts that warm body and mind during the winter. Now I’m drawn to dishes that still give warmth but have a lighter feel.

leeks and parsnipsmadras blend

I bought some locally grown parsnips and dug up some small but very flavourful leeks from the allotment and made a spicy, aromatic soup flavoured with roasted madras spice mix. The flavours of roasted coriander, cumin and mustard add layers of earthy flavours and balance the heat of the chili, pepper and ginger.

chives

 

I blended the soup to give it a smooth, light texture and snipped some chives from the garden as a garnish and a reminder that everything’s beginning to grow.

Here’s the recipe..

 

 

Sarah’s Spicy Spring Parsnip Soup

For 2 servings you’ll need:

1 large or 2 small leeks, 1 big clove garlic, 2 large parsnips, 2 Tbsp oil, 2 tsp Dinebox Madras blend, 1/2 tsp DB Pepper blend, 1/4 tsp salt, 1/2 – 3/4 ltr stock.

spicy parsnip soup1.Wash the leeks and chop. (I try and use every bit of the leek and only discard the very tips or outer leaves if they’re too tough. There’s so much flavour in the green leaves as long as they are cooked till tender).

2.Peel the parsnips and chop.

3. Peel the garlic and crush.

4. Gently saute the leeks and parsnips in the oil for 10 mins.

5. Add the garlic and Madras blend and saute for a couple of mins.

6.Add the rest of the ingredients, bring to the boil then simmer for about 20mins until the vegetables are soft. (How much stock you add depends on how thick you like your soup. It’s easier to make a thick soup and then add a little more stock, than make a thin soup that you have to overcook to reduce the liquid).

7.Blend then serve with a garnish of chopped chives. A swirl of cream would also add to the creaminess of the texture.

 

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